Archive for category School nutrition

The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity

Researchers looked at how the supply of fast food affects the obesity rates of 3 million school children and the weight gain of over 1 million pregnant women. They found that among 9th grade children, a fast food restaurant within a tenth of a mile of a school is associated with at least a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates.

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School kids skipping breakfast are missing healthy brain fuel

A new Australian survey found that 22% of parents interviewed said their children skip breakfast on three to five school days of each week, and a further 20% skip breakfast on one or two school days. The remaining 58% of parents said their school aged children always ate breakfast before school.

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Promoting Healthy Communities and Reducing Childhood Obesity – Legislative Options

This 58 page report summarizes state legislation proposed and passed in two broad policy categories (a) Healthy Eating and Physical Activity and (b) Healthy Community Design and Access to Healthy Food. The first category addresses policy approaches aimed primarily at nutrition and physical education in schools. The second category focuses on the built environment: land use, transportation and agriculture options. Enjoy reading.

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What Can Schools Do about Junk Food Advertising?

Junk food advertising on school campuses can undermine schools’ work to promote health and wellness among students. A new fact sheet that explains how school districts can develop an advertising policy that promotes health has been developed.

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Promotion and Provision of Drinking Water in Schools for Overweight Prevention: Randomized, Controlled Cluster Trial

2950 German children age 8.3 ± 0.7 years participated. Water fountains were installed and teachers presented 4 prepared classroom lessons in 17 out of 32 to promote water consumption. Water consumption after the intervention was 1.1 glasses per day greater in the intervention group. The risk of overweight at the follow-up assessment was significantly reduced by 31% in the intervention schools. Amazing!

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The impact of the Texas public school nutrition policy on student food selection and sales in Texas

Researchers collected lunch food production records from 47 schools in 11 Texas school districts for the school years before (2003-2004) and after (2004-2005) policy implementation. cafeterias served significantly fewer high-fat vegetable items per student postpolicy. Postpolicy snack bar sales of large bags of chips were significantly reduced, and baked chips sales significantly increased. CONCLUSION: School food policy changes have improved foods served or sold to students.

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Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies presented at School Conferences

Manel Kappagoda and Lori Stern discussed way to create a healthier school food environment at the Celebrating Educational Opportunities for Students of All Cultures Conference in Austin, TX, on March 27. They presented on the Alliance’s tools for schools on implementing successful school wellness policies and NPLAN’s model advertising policies and model beverage vending contract.

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Get junk food out of U.S. schools

Congress can fight the epidemic of childhood obesity by getting “junk” food out of school stores and snack machines, a parent-teacher group and the American Dietetic Association said on Tuesday.

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School Environments and Policies to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

This review show that schools have been making some progress in improving the school food and physical activity environments but that much more work is needed. Stronger policies are needed to provide healthier meals to students at schools; limit their access to low-nutrient, energy-dense foods during the school day; and increase the frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activity at school.

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Eatable schoolyards and slow food

Enjoy this CBS 60 minutes special about the Mother of the Slow Food movement Alice Waters.

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