Archive for category Food service

Can restaurants do healthier food?

As a nutritionist Marion Nestle cares deeply about the effects of food on health. She want restaurants to make it much easier for customers to make healthier food choices. Here’s what I wish restaurants would do: (1) Give a price break for smaller portions. (2) Make healthy kids’ meals the default. (3) Cook with less salt.

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Play More, Eat Right, and Push Away the Screen

The National Institutes of Health is now Partnering With Subway Restaurants To Expand Movement To Prevent Childhood Obesity. Subway will promote the ‘We Can!’ messages in restaurants and through the SubwayKids.com Web site. In addition, in collaboration with Subway and Scholastic, Inc. We Can! materials have been adapted into fun tools and activities for teachers, students, and parents, including a “You Are What You Eat” poster, reproducible activities for students, and send-home sheets for parents.

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Study Finds Few Fast-Food Customers Never Review Nutrition Information

Of 4,300 people purchasing food at the restaurants surveyed, only six looked at the nutrition information. Specifically, two McDonald’s patrons accessed nutrition information before making a food purchase, and two reviewed the information following a purchase. Three Burger King patrons looked at provided nutrition information, and one Au Bon Pain customer used the in-store computer to access nutrition information. No Starbucks patrons reviewed the nutrition information pamphlet. Based on the findings, the researchers conclude that fast-food establishments are ineffectively delivering nutrition information and call for such information to be posted in a more visible place, such as a menu board. The study will appear in the May issue of the American Journal of Public Health. See also: http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSTRE52P7FU20090326

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New Global Association Promotes Benefits Of Worksite Health

A newly formed International Association for Worksite Health Promotion (IAWHP) is dedicated to worksite health and encouraging employees to be active and healthy. CDC and The Coca-Cola Company support IAWHP.

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Get junk food out of U.S. schools

Congress can fight the epidemic of childhood obesity by getting “junk” food out of school stores and snack machines, a parent-teacher group and the American Dietetic Association said on Tuesday.

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People Will Make Healthier Choices If Restaurants Provide Nutritional Data

The association between eating out and weight-related diseases has led to demands for nutritional labeling of restaurant foods. A new study examines the potential benefits of such labeling.

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Healthier choices progress report 2009

The Which? consumer magasin in the UK just published a highly interessting 36 page report called “Hungry for Change?”. It’s about their healthy eating campaign, the demands they set out to government and industry and the progress that been made. Enjoy reading.

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Fast-food, soda consumption and overweight in adolescents in Jamaica

For 1317 adolescents aged 15-19 years logistic regression was used to examine the association of overweight or high waist circumference with fast-food and sweetened beverage consumption, adjusting for potential confounders. Overweight occurs frequently among Jamaican 15-19-year-olds and is associated with increased consumption of sweetened beverages. High WC is more prevalent among females and is related to low consumption of fruits and vegetables. Measures to reduce the consumption of sweetened beverages and increase fruit intake may reduce the prevalence of excess body fat among adolescents.

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Fast-food and neighbourhood food environment

Parents of 800 Australian kids completed a questionnaire regarding the frequency per week their child usually ate takeaway or fast foods. Access to outlets where takeaway or fast food could be purchased did not predict frequency of consumption of takeaway or fast food in the expected direction. Such relationships appear to be complex and may not be adequately captured by the measures of access included in the current study.

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Built Environment and 1-Year Change in Weight and Waist Circumference in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

The authors surveyed 1,145 residents recruited from 120 neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon. They examined neighborhood built environment characteristics (fast-food restaurant density, walkability) and individual eating-out and physical activity behaviors in relation to 1-year change in body weight among adults 50–75 years of age at baseline. Findings point to the negative influences of the availability of neighborhood fast-food outlets and individual unhealthy eating behaviors that jointly affect weight gain; however, better neighborhood walkability and increased levels of physical activity are likely to be associated with maintaining a healthy weight over time. See also: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090303161431.htm

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